By joining the PAcMEN training network, I got the opportunity to work at the TU Delft’s Industrial Microbiology section supervised by Prof. Jack Pronk and Dr. Jean-Marc Daran. Not only the wish to understand, reconstruct and improve micro-organisms to extend their usage in industrial processes, but also exchanging knowledge and learning for instance about scientific communication and entrepreneurship within the training network drives and excites me.

Research Interests



Anna Kristina Wronska

Research Interests


TU Delft’s IMB section  is an international research group that currently harbours 20 PhD students, 5 postdocs and 10 different nationalities. Its infrastructure for controlled cultivation of micro-organisms includes 46 bioreactor set-ups, while its molecular facilities include MiSeq and MinION sequencing equipment, an Affymetrix microarray set-up and a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Analysis of genome sequence data is done in close collaboration with the Delft Bioinformatics group. Recent highlights from IMB’s metabolic engineering research include the development of bakers’ yeast strains for production of bioethanol from pentose sugars (now commercialized by DSM), the functional expression of a pyruvate-dehydrogenase complex in the yeast cytosol and the successful implementation in yeast of Calvin-cycle enzymes, thereby strongly reducing formation of glycerol as a byproduct of anaerobic yeast cultures. IMB actively collaborates with international academic groups and with major fermentation industries, including DSM, Amyris and Heineken.

Research Interests

 

During my studies of biotechnology at the Technical University Braunschweig I participated two years in the iGEM competition and got fascinated by synthetic biology and innovative ideas provided by this discipline. Carrying out my master thesis at the Systems- and Synthetic Biology group headed by Prof. Jens Nielsen at Chalmers University of Gothenburg in Sweden, I got an insight how synthetic biology can serve as a tool for metabolic engineering. Especially this combination offers a lot of space for creativity, as engineering a biological system able to produce any conceivable compound such as biofuels or pharmaceuticals. Under supervision of Prof. Christer Larsson I worked on 2‑butanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and decided to pursue a Ph.D. in this or a closely related field.

About the Project

Research Interests